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Looking for a new job but you’re not sure about how a company ACTUALLY is? Message PAST employees on LinkedIn, they are a lot less likely to lie to you.

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Looking for a new job but you’re not sure about how a company ACTUALLY is?

Message PAST employees on LinkedIn, they are a lot less likely to lie to you.

Like many of you, work life balance is basically as important as compensation to me. After being at some companies with terrible cultures and work like balances, when I started looking for a new job, I’d connect with past employees at companies I’m interviewing with and ask them what they thought of the company. While an employer might say “we have a work hard play hard attitude here” which is vague and a bad answer designed to keep you interested. A past employee is a lot less likely to lie to you and will tell you that it means they will work you to death and have a pizza party once a quarter.

Just keep the message simple and professional. Design it in a way where it just seems like you are doing your due diligence so even if that person you message is actually still best friends with your potential manager it will just seem like an eager interviewee going above and beyond for the job. Good luck!


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  1. This is very bad advice. Don’t do this, if you do get the position you will have already made people wary of you before you even start. If they know the hiring managers, you may kill your chances and have an offer rescinded.

  2. If a person I’d never met before messaged me on LinkedIn asking me about a company I used to work for there is a 100% chance I would ignore them. They’re either working for the company and trying to trap me in some way or they’re just a stranger who doesn’t understand boundaries and wants to waste my time.

  3. I’ve heard this so many times. You should also ask past employees about compensation if there in the same position as you or close to it, and career growth if you plan on moving up in the company. You should also ask about education and the turnover rate. Some companies will pay for schooling or certifications so you should ask if that is something that is available for your position. That way when your interviewing and they ask if you have any questions for them you can get an honest interview from your possible future employer,

  4. This could work well if you have really great social skills and the person you contact is friendly. But you also don’t know how this person handled themselves in the workplace so I feel like it would be difficult to gauge if their opinion is objective/useful.

    Or they may have had a terrible experience through no fault of their own, but won’t tell you this. Similar to how you don’t speak badly about a former employer in an interview. I wouldn’t be comfortable being so open with a stranger.

    I also don’t agree that you’d look like you’re going above and beyond for the job, it’s clearly in the interest of yourself only and it could definitely come across that way.

    This could be a great LPT but imo you need to be very careful about how you pull this off.

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Written by nairaab chief

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